As Catholics we understand the dignity of every human person and believe that care for the sick, dying and elderly takes a loving and compassionate form in palliative care. Please take the time to read the statement from the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops President, Archbishop Durocher, whose words echo my feelings. Please read his statement below.

His Excellency Bishop Douglas Crosby, OMI
Bishop of Hamilton

Consultation Process

Further Reading

Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Why not? Quick answers to common arguments

Life Giving Love. A National Campaign for Palliative and Home Care: Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide

A Warning for Canada: Oregon’s Experience with Assisted Suicide Shows Safe Guards Don’t Work

Videos

Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide FAQ

Give Us Time

Death with Dignity

Statement on Physician-Assisted Suicide

by the Most Reverend Paul-André Durocher, Archbishop of Gatineau and President of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops

 

 

Catholics are called by their faith to assist all those in need, particularly the poor, the suffering and the dying. Comforting the dying and accompanying them in love and solidarity has been considered by the Church since its beginning a principal expression of Christian mercy.

Helping someone commit suicide, however, is neither an act of justice or mercy, nor is it part of palliative care. The decision of the Supreme Court of Canada today does not change Catholic teaching. "[A]n act or omission which, of itself or by intention, causes death in order to eliminate suffering constitutes a murder gravely contrary to the dignity of the human person and to the respect due to the living God, our Creator." (Catechism of the Catholic Church, 2277).

The Bishops of our country invite Canadians, especially Catholics, to do all they can to bring comfort and support for all those who are dying and for their loved ones, so that no one, because of loneliness, vulnerability, loss of autonomy, or fear of pain and suffering, feels they have no choice but to commit suicide. The Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops will continue to promote palliative and home care, and to encourage all the faithful to work for the betterment of the elderly, the disabled, the ill, and those who are socially isolated.

My brother Bishops and I entreat governments and courts to interpret today's judgment in its narrowest terms, resisting any calls to go beyond this to so-called acts of "mercy killing" and euthanasia. We again call on provincial and territorial governments to ensure good-quality palliative care in all their jurisdictions. We also urge governments and professional associations to implement policies and guidelines which ensure respect for the freedom of conscience of all health-care workers as well as administrators who will not and cannot accept suicide as a medical solution to pain and suffering.

6 February 2015

+ Paul-André Durocher
Archbishop of Gatineau
President of the Canadian Conference of Catholic Bishops

 

Source: CCCB website